Presenting the Elegant and Subdued Bird in Gentle Pastel Shades of Blue-Gray and Pale Pink. – Pet Care Blog

Presenting the Elegant and Subdued Bird in Gentle Pastel Shades of Blue-Gray and Pale Pink. – Pet Care Blog

Presenting the Elegant and Subdued Bird in Gentle Pastel Shades of Blue-Gray and Pale Pink.

The male long-tailed finch (Poephila acuticauda) weighs between 13.5 and 16.2 grammes, while the female weighs between 11.4 and 17.6 grammes. Both species have a length of 160 mm. The bird’s long, pointed black tail completes its appearance. They wear a noticeable roundish black bib across their throat and upper chest. They are the largest species of finch in Australia because of their long tails. Their overall hue is brown, and they have a blue-grey head, neck, and eye ring. Their lore is slender and black. Their flanks and belly are rather pinkish-grey in colour. A black ribbon crosses the rear, with white at the other end.

Generally speaking, female birds have shorter wings and tails than male birds.

Native to northern Australia, the Long-tailed finch ranges from the Kimberley area to the Gulf of Carpentaria.

Their preferred habitats are grassland and grassy woodland.

The Long-tailed finch prefers to eat the ripe and semi-ripe seeds of grass and herbaceous plants in the wild. They consume insects as part of their diet, particularly in the mating season. Additionally, they will capture flying insects like termites with wings.

Breeding in naturally occurring hollows in trees or shrubs, long-tailed finches like creating nests composed of grass with a wider blade on the outside and an interior chamber braided from finer stems, seed heads, and woolly plant fibres. A nest can be constructed in a tree up to four metres above the ground and up to eighteen metres high. It is possible to deposit up to five dull white oval eggs, which parents can then incubate for a maximum of 17 days. Reports have surfaced of older siblings assisting their parents in raising the younger siblings.

This bird is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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